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262's 85 Fiero SE LX9 F23 swap thread lots of pics

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  • Originally posted by robertisaar View Post
    depends, how much external circuitry do you want to deal with? with limited inputs that can read period and pulse on-time measurements, I would suggest just the MAF be used for it. if you wanted flex-fuel capability, I would run its signal through a frequency-voltage converter to make a 0-5V signal that could be read on a plain a/d input. wouldn't be able to read fuel temp, but that seems less critical.
    sounds like a plan.
    Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

    I get bummed out every time I type "titties" in the search bar and nothing pops up....

    Built not bought, because bolt-ons don't...

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    • Scrub that aluminum down better next time-it's cast and so it's gonna come up dirty like that but you can get it cleaner. Take a file and remove the sand-cast finish from the surface, both inside and outside, and it will help considerably.

      Also looks like you've dipped the tungsten

      Those welds may be fine, but a lot of times with dirty aluminum it'll seep through the porous weld over time. If you have a mysterious coolant leak in the future, you might find it there.

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      • Originally posted by Xnke View Post
        Scrub that aluminum down better next time-it's cast and so it's gonna come up dirty like that but you can get it cleaner. Take a file and remove the sand-cast finish from the surface, both inside and outside, and it will help considerably.
        the outside was worked over with a grunder and flap wheel, inside was bare as cast. next time, I'll try cleaning the inside as well, thanks!


        Originally posted by Xnke View Post
        Also looks like you've dipped the tungsten
        LOL, busted... didn't do it on purpose. I really need a small welding table, trying to control a foot pedal standing at the bed of my truck, and trying to keep the work piece where I want it can result in unexpected movement...

        Originally posted by Xnke View Post
        Those welds may be fine, but a lot of times with dirty aluminum it'll seep through the porous weld over time. If you have a mysterious coolant leak in the future, you might find it there.
        it'll be easy to spot if it's there. thanks.

        I think the only thing that wasn't mentioned that would have also helped. was a mild pre-heat.
        Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

        I get bummed out every time I type "titties" in the search bar and nothing pops up....

        Built not bought, because bolt-ons don't...

        Comment


        • Originally posted by ericjon262 View Post
          the outside was worked over with a grunder and flap wheel, inside was bare as cast. next time, I'll try cleaning the inside as well, thanks!




          LOL, busted... didn't do it on purpose. I really need a small welding table, trying to control a foot pedal standing at the bed of my truck, and trying to keep the work piece where I want it can result in unexpected movement...



          it'll be easy to spot if it's there. thanks.

          I think the only thing that wasn't mentioned that would have also helped. was a mild pre-heat.
          A grinder and flapper wheels are not the best choices for prepping aluminum for welding. Aluminum is soft and when using those types of item will actually roll the dirt into the metal. It is better to use stainless wire brushes, files and carbide burrs. A mild acidic cleaner can also help. Also as you noted, a pre-heat sometimes helps.
          Ed

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          • thanks cor the tips. I'm a bit new to aluminum. the advice makes sense. got a cleaner you would recommend?
            Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

            I get bummed out every time I type "titties" in the search bar and nothing pops up....

            Built not bought, because bolt-ons don't...

            Comment


            • No particular brand of cleaner although the citric acid based cleaners can and do work well especially with the degreasing. For something more aggressive, check with your welding consumables supplier. They should have something on the shelf. A final rinse (and dry) with clean water also helps to remove any residue the cleaning agent my leave. As Xnke noted, clean both sides of the parts.

              When welding aluminum, I can not stress how important cleaning and joint prep is. Case in point, I remember mig welding a part for the Navy. I didn't notice a spot of dirt about the size of a pin head that was in the weld joint area. During welding when I came to that spot, the weld puddle literally split apart and recombined as I moved past that spot. I had to cut out the weld and spot of dirt to repair.
              Ed

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              • Best is to file it down to get the cast finish off, then clean with a stainless wire brush that you only use on aluminum. Don't use that brush for anything but degreased aluminum, and once you brush it, do the weld within an hour or re-brush it.

                Sent from my KYOCERA-E6560 using Tapatalk

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                • Originally posted by 45es View Post
                  A grinder and flapper wheels are not the best choices for prepping aluminum for welding. Aluminum is soft and when using those types of item will actually roll the dirt into the metal. It is better to use stainless wire brushes, files and carbide burrs. A mild acidic cleaner can also help. Also as you noted, a pre-heat sometimes helps.
                  Ditto on the stainless wire brush. I was going to suggest that. Also, set your SS wire brushes aside for aluminum only and do not use them for anything else. I keep mine in a big ziploc bag to keep it clean. (I'm not yet a welder, but when I prep a piece of aluminum for welding, I like to be able to to it right).
                  Current:
                  \'87 Fiero GT: 12.86@106 - too dam many valves; ran 12.94 @ 112 on new engine, then broke a CV joint
                  \'88 Fiero Formula: slow and attention getting; LZ8 followed by LLT power forthcoming
                  \'88 BMW 325iX: The penultimate driving machine awaiting a heart transplant

                  Gone, mostly forgotten:
                  \'90 Pontiac 6000 SE AWD: slow but invisible

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                  • Another no-no for aluminum is autogenous welding-don't do it. It might look like it works but you ALWAYS have to add filler rod to get a strong joint.

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                    • well, the aluminum fill/thermostat housing performed about like I thought it would, just not as good as I hoped... leaked like crazy. 1 pinhole leak from a weld, and from the entire cap. I either warped the cap, or it's cheap junk I'm guessing its a combination of the 2. I reinstalled the neck I had with a bleed, and finished a high point fill that fills at the suction of the water pump, much more discrete, and should be just as effective. I took it for a spin again, seemed to still want to overheat, not as bad. I'm going to pull the rad and inspect for foreign material or signs of clogging. as well as try to flush out the cooling tubes and see if anything comes out.
                      Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

                      I get bummed out every time I type "titties" in the search bar and nothing pops up....

                      Built not bought, because bolt-ons don't...

                      Comment


                      • quick update, did a pneumatic test of the cooling system, went to 22 PSI, and was at 20 PSI in 2 minutes, took about 23 minutes to go from 22 psi to 12 psi. not sure how much (if any) was test rig leakage vice system leakage. I'm going to fill the system, and start the car to see how quick pressure builds, if it immediately jumps, probably the headgasket, if it doesn't, probably not. . If it doesn't point towards that, I'm gonna back the car out of the garage, clean the floor, and lay down some paper, refill the system with water and dye, and re-pressurize to see if I can pinpoint a leak location.

                        radiator cap tested fine, so that can be checked off the list.
                        Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

                        I get bummed out every time I type "titties" in the search bar and nothing pops up....

                        Built not bought, because bolt-ons don't...

                        Comment


                        • re-torqued the head gaskets the other night, wasn't real happy when I got almost a whole turn on several of the studs. between that replacing a couple of old worn looking hoses. the cooling system appears to be holding pressure I haven't done a high pressure test yet. I'm also about 2/3's of the way done with my low mount alternator bracket. the alternator will be mounted near where it was on the stock 2.8, but still retain the factory 3x00 accessory drive (serpentine belt). I re-clocked the stock bracket so it points down, and am adding a few steel supports so the cheap cast aluminum won't fail.

                          pretty crappy picture, I'll take more as I finish it up.



                          all I have left to do is fab up the lower mount, and a heat shield to protect it from the exhaust. the idler pulley pictured directly above the alternator most likely won't be necessary. the plan is to use a LT1 (gen 2) f-body belt tensioner between the alternator and crank pulley.

                          this will allow me to install a dogbone again in the stock location, as well as put a valve cover with an oil fill on the rear head, which is much more convenient.
                          Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

                          I get bummed out every time I type "titties" in the search bar and nothing pops up....

                          Built not bought, because bolt-ons don't...

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                          • Very cool! I'll be looking at your arrangement very closely. That seems like a great solution to the dog-bone & alternator placement that I've never been happy with on my LX9. Looking forward to seeing it running!

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                            • Originally posted by neophile_17 View Post
                              Very cool! I'll be looking at your arrangement very closely. That seems like a great solution to the dog-bone & alternator placement that I've never been happy with on my LX9. Looking forward to seeing it running!
                              I'll keep you in the loop, it should be easy enough to replicate when it's done.
                              Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

                              I get bummed out every time I type "titties" in the search bar and nothing pops up....

                              Built not bought, because bolt-ons don't...

                              Comment


                              • well, I got fed up with trying to make the stock bracket do what I wanted, so I ditched it and the stock alternator and began whipping up a bracket of my own design, so far, it's looking decent, but I still have quite a bit of work to do. the new alternator is off of a 2003 gmc safari w/4.3 v6. it's dimensionally very similar(slightly smaller case.), but it mounts with bolts parallel to the axis of rotation of the rotor instead of perpendicularly. I chose this alternator because it will be easier to mount imo, I'll post pictures when I take some later tonight.

                                The trick is still going to be making the tensioner work, which is proving to be more of a nightmare than expected.
                                Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us.

                                I get bummed out every time I type "titties" in the search bar and nothing pops up....

                                Built not bought, because bolt-ons don't...

                                Comment

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